Leveling with Louie on education funding

By Larry Sand
02/18/2020
A recent chat with my cousin illuminates the chasm between fact and fantasy. After a recent post in which I detailed California’s abuse of taxpayers, I got a call from my cousin Louie, an aging Hollywood screenwriter. Known as the “red sheep” of the family, he firmly believes that pouring more money into government schools...

TAGS: Alex Caputo-Pearl, education spending, James Agresti, Lance Izumi, Larry Sand, National Assessment of Educational Progress, Pacific Research Institute, Prop. 13, Reason Foundation, Richard Rider, teachers union, United Teachers of Los Angeles

The faux nonprofit prophets

By Larry Sand
12/24/2019
The clamor over for-profit charters has no substance whatsoever. Among the many vapid rallying cries in the 2019 presidential follies is the one that stresses the importance of eliminating for-profit charter schools. In October, Elizabeth Warren released her education plan that proposed eliminating them, and using the IRS to investigate existing schools that may “actually...

TAGS: Bernie Sanders, California Teachers Association, Elizabeth Warren, James Tooley, Kids Not Profits, Larry Sand, National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, National Assessment of Educational Progress, teachers union, The Beautiful Tree

Montana, SCOTUS, and your kids

By Larry Sand
12/17/2019
Americans are losing confidence that public schools will improve, but a Supreme Court case could pave the way to greater parental choice. A recent in-depth survey by RealClearPolitics concludes that a majority of registered voters are dissatisfied with the performance of America’s education system and “have little confidence that public schools will improve any time...

TAGS: Blaine Amendment, education spending, Larry Sand, National Assessment of Educational Progress, PISA, school choice, tax-credit scholarships, teachers union, Trinity Lutheran Church v. Pauley, Zelman v. Simmons-Harris

Undisrupted education

By Larry Sand
04/17/2018
The world has progressed in amazing ways since 1983, but for the most part, public education has stagnated. In 1983, the first mobile telephones intended for public use were released, ARPANET became the technical foundation of the internet, and A Nation at Risk: The Imperative for Educational Reform was released. The latter was a report...

TAGS: A Nation at Risk, Center for Education Reform, Charter schools, Clayton Christensen, EdChoice, educational savings accounts, Fordham Institute, Heritage Foundation, Jeanne Allen, Jeb Bush, Larry Sand, Lindsey Burke, Matthew Ladner, Mike Petrilli, NAEP, National Assessment of Educational Progress, tax-credit scholarships, teachers union, vouchers